• Brain mapping is competitive – use it or lose it - “Neurons that fire together, wire together”

  • “Neurons out of sync, fail to link”

  • For any brain activity, the optimal neurons are selected (Edelman, 1987 Nobel Prize)

  • The critical period of NGF/BDNF (brain mapping on steroids) is infancy and early childhood – events and experiences at this time are extremely cognatively deterministic

  • Excess white noise in infancy triggers an early overload of BDNF which we think results in decreased intelligence and sometimes autism

  • Autism, essentially, is a human mind that cannot concieve of other human minds

  • ALC (supplement) somewhat mimics the effects of BNDF via similar reactions in the nucleus basalis

  • Cocaine lowers the neurological thresholds for pleasure – on its own does very little, but makes everything enjoyable seem much more so

  • Mania is a state of heightened pleasure and lowered aversion. In this state, we are excited, optimistic, hopeful. Things that normally would bother us, don’t.

  • Dopamine (pleasure chemical released naturally in our brains) loves novelty.

  • Orgasm produces oxytocin which promotes cognative reconfiguration, thus promotes pair bonding as a result of sex

  • Successful cultural assimilation takes one generation (due to childhood criticality)

  • Youthful neural plasticity transforms into adult crystalline intelligence (starting around the same age as testosterone begins to fall off ~ 25)

  • Overexposure to TV and video games leads to ADD-like symptoms, which in turn lead to difficulty completing complex tasks

  • Rousseau (early 1700’s), Condorcet (late 1700’s), Franklin (early 1800’s) and Jefferson (late 1800’s) each expanded on their predecessors contemplation of the human brain’s malleability, essentially concluding it made a perfect cognative state indefinable – an infinately moving, morally relativistic yardstick. The primary limitation on such a personal journey is our inevitable mortality.

  • Short term memory [and knowledge] fades fast. Repetition over time (rote learning) cultivates new ‘brain maps’ and thus becomes long term memory

  • REM sleep promotes plasticity (imprints short term memory into long)

  • Cardiovascular exercise promotes neurogenesis [1] [2]

  • Learning extends the life of existing neurons

  • Being physically immobile and in the same environment leads to brain atrophy

  • To age gracefully - Use your senses (eyes, ears, touch etc) as much as possible, preferably in new ways. Be barefoot wherever possible.

  • Never stop learning. Try and learn a language – despite the difficulty of crystalline learning, this is an optimal cognative endeavour.

  • Frank LLoyd Wright designed the Guggenheim (architecturally unique museum in uptown NYC) at age 90.

  • “Cognative reserve” built by education and (socially/cognatively/physically) challenging activity

  • Your brain at 20 is like a very fast single core processor. Your brain at 50 is like a slower clocked multithreaded processor with better SNR

  • Blueberries, raspberries and strawberrys are awesome for many reasons, including those related to neural health

  • Cardiovascular health (and low blood pressure) strongly linked to brain health